Author Topic: Fox News: At it again  (Read 13716 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline runawayjimbo

  • Wrote the Book
  • **
  • Posts: 4710
  • Karma: 186
  • Gender: Male
Re: Fox News: At it again
« Reply #15 on: April 20, 2012, 10:29:53 AM »
::obligatory Bill Hicks quote::

 :hereitisyousentimentalbastard

We've done research.

Bill Hicks wants me to kill myself.  :cry:

I wondered why you were always posting shit from Adage.com. Now I get it.

You just called my brother-in-law insane.

I've done that before.

"Sane" was probably a poor choice of words; "reasonable" is more like it.

Offline runawayjimbo

  • Wrote the Book
  • **
  • Posts: 4710
  • Karma: 186
  • Gender: Male
Re: Fox News: At it again
« Reply #16 on: April 20, 2012, 10:33:51 AM »
Meanwhile, CNN, in an attempt to appease both poles and not seem partisan, refuses to question either side's rhetoric.  :tte:

In keeping with the news as morbid/voyeuristic entertainment, CNN is currently streaming the bond hearing for George Zimmerman. Now, I get that this is a highly charged case with heated opinions on both sides, but live coverage of a bond hearing seems pretty excessive to me.

Offline twatts

  • Wrote the Book
  • **
  • Posts: 2848
  • Karma: 216
  • Gender: Male
  • PHISH
    • http://db.etree.org/twatts
Re: Fox News: At it again
« Reply #17 on: April 20, 2012, 10:58:30 AM »
The only people watching FN are the partisan ideologues who have already made their minds up

Perhaps, but there are plenty of people that never pay any attention (like my wife), who all of sudden hear something and thinks its a huge controversy...

The fact that the average idiots accepts "obama's failure" without being able to point to a single tangible thing is proof of the "Foxification" of the average news-viewer... 

Terry
 
Oh! That! No, no, no, you're not ready to step into The Court of the Crimson King. At this stage in your training an album like that could turn you into an evil scientist.

----------------------

I want super-human will
I want better than average skill
I want a million dollar bill
And I want it all in a Pill

Offline twatts

  • Wrote the Book
  • **
  • Posts: 2848
  • Karma: 216
  • Gender: Male
  • PHISH
    • http://db.etree.org/twatts
Re: Fox News: At it again
« Reply #18 on: April 20, 2012, 10:59:52 AM »
but live coverage of a bond hearing seems pretty excessive to me.

Does it sell advertising space???  If yes, then CNN has achieved its goal...  Just like Fox...

Terry
Oh! That! No, no, no, you're not ready to step into The Court of the Crimson King. At this stage in your training an album like that could turn you into an evil scientist.

----------------------

I want super-human will
I want better than average skill
I want a million dollar bill
And I want it all in a Pill

Offline VDB

  • In the Band
  • ***
  • Posts: 8066
  • Karma: 279
  • Gender: Male
Re: Fox News: At it again
« Reply #19 on: April 20, 2012, 11:12:28 AM »
but live coverage of a bond hearing seems pretty excessive to me.

Does it sell advertising space???  If yes, then CNN has achieved its goal...  Just like Fox...

Terry

It's all about the eyeballs.
there is no explanation
it's all inside your head


de gustibus non disputandum

Offline runawayjimbo

  • Wrote the Book
  • **
  • Posts: 4710
  • Karma: 186
  • Gender: Male
Re: Fox News: At it again
« Reply #20 on: April 20, 2012, 11:22:39 AM »
The only people watching FN are the partisan ideologues who have already made their minds up

Perhaps, but there are plenty of people that never pay any attention (like my wife), who all of sudden hear something and thinks its a huge controversy...

The fact that the average idiots accepts "obama's failure" without being able to point to a single tangible thing is proof of the "Foxification" of the average news-viewer... 

Terry
 

Fortunately (or maybe not), these "controversies" don't last very long because they are just manufactured noise to distract from the real issues. In the end, do you think your wife would vote for Obama if she hadn't heard about these issues? If the answer is no, than I'd argue FN isn't the far-reaching influence peddler you seem to be suggesting it is. It's annoying for sure and I get the frustration of the blatant disregard for journalistic integrity, but to say it's dumbening the country by polluting people's minds is, I think, a tad alarmist.

I agree with your point about people just regurgitating the nonsense they hear without thinking for themselves, but I don't think it is representative of the average voter (what does "average voter" even mean?). A lot of people take Rachel Maddow's words as gospel too.

Offline VDB

  • In the Band
  • ***
  • Posts: 8066
  • Karma: 279
  • Gender: Male
Re: Fox News: At it again
« Reply #21 on: April 20, 2012, 11:53:19 AM »
(what does "average voter" even mean?)

"Really fucking stupid person"
there is no explanation
it's all inside your head


de gustibus non disputandum

Offline twatts

  • Wrote the Book
  • **
  • Posts: 2848
  • Karma: 216
  • Gender: Male
  • PHISH
    • http://db.etree.org/twatts
Re: Fox News: At it again
« Reply #22 on: April 20, 2012, 12:00:08 PM »
The only people watching FN are the partisan ideologues who have already made their minds up

Perhaps, but there are plenty of people that never pay any attention (like my wife), who all of sudden hear something and thinks its a huge controversy...

The fact that the average idiots accepts "obama's failure" without being able to point to a single tangible thing is proof of the "Foxification" of the average news-viewer... 

Terry
 

Fortunately (or maybe not), these "controversies" don't last very long because they are just manufactured noise to distract from the real issues. In the end, do you think your wife would vote for Obama if she hadn't heard about these issues? If the answer is no, than I'd argue FN isn't the far-reaching influence peddler you seem to be suggesting it is. It's annoying for sure and I get the frustration of the blatant disregard for journalistic integrity, but to say it's dumbening the country by polluting people's minds is, I think, a tad alarmist.

I agree with your point about people just regurgitating the nonsense they hear without thinking for themselves, but I don't think it is representative of the average voter (what does "average voter" even mean?). A lot of people take Rachel Maddow's words as gospel too.

Your first paragraph is a bit convuluted...  I don't understand your query...

But my wife will vote for OB b/c "he's a democrat", if for nothing else...  At the same time, she can easily be swayed to vote against her own interests...  I think you give too much credit to average Americans, the fact that what was once considered right wing lunacy is now Tea Party Idealogy is proof in my eyes... 

Terry
« Last Edit: April 20, 2012, 12:04:32 PM by twatts likes ghoti »
Oh! That! No, no, no, you're not ready to step into The Court of the Crimson King. At this stage in your training an album like that could turn you into an evil scientist.

----------------------

I want super-human will
I want better than average skill
I want a million dollar bill
And I want it all in a Pill

Offline Hicks

  • IKKULUS
  • Gamehendge
  • ****
  • Posts: 21327
  • Karma: 1369
Re: Fox News: At it again
« Reply #23 on: April 20, 2012, 12:11:12 PM »
Isn't Fox News the highest rated news channel at this point?

They may be preaching to the choir and that choir may be solely made up of crazies, but it's a big fucking choir. 
Quote from: Trey Anastasio
But, I don't think our fans do happily lap it up, I think they go online and talk about how it was a bad show.

Offline slslbs

  • Gamehendge
  • ****
  • Posts: 14738
  • Karma: 1026
  • Gender: Male
  • Let there be songs to fill the air
    • music list
Re: Fox News: At it again
« Reply #24 on: April 20, 2012, 12:18:21 PM »
the other thing is that if you say things loud enough, and often enough, they become true. So if FN says an hours worth for crazy shit, chances are some of it will stick. People will start talking about it, it will be overheard, become a soundbite, and then become true.
ex - Hussein caused 9-11 (most people don't believe it now, but they did when the war started0, death panels
"toss away stuff you don't need in the end
but keep what's important, and know who's your friend"
"It's a 106 miles to Chicago. We got a full tank of gas, half a pack of cigarettes, it's dark and we're wearing sunglasses."

Offline runawayjimbo

  • Wrote the Book
  • **
  • Posts: 4710
  • Karma: 186
  • Gender: Male
Re: Fox News: At it again
« Reply #25 on: April 20, 2012, 01:02:32 PM »
The only people watching FN are the partisan ideologues who have already made their minds up

Perhaps, but there are plenty of people that never pay any attention (like my wife), who all of sudden hear something and thinks its a huge controversy...

The fact that the average idiots accepts "obama's failure" without being able to point to a single tangible thing is proof of the "Foxification" of the average news-viewer... 

Terry
 

Fortunately (or maybe not), these "controversies" don't last very long because they are just manufactured noise to distract from the real issues. In the end, do you think your wife would vote for Obama if she hadn't heard about these issues? If the answer is no, than I'd argue FN isn't the far-reaching influence peddler you seem to be suggesting it is. It's annoying for sure and I get the frustration of the blatant disregard for journalistic integrity, but to say it's dumbening the country by polluting people's minds is, I think, a tad alarmist.

I agree with your point about people just regurgitating the nonsense they hear without thinking for themselves, but I don't think it is representative of the average voter (what does "average voter" even mean?). A lot of people take Rachel Maddow's words as gospel too.

Your first paragraph is a bit convuluted...  I don't understand your query...

But my wife will vote for OB b/c "he's a democrat", if for nothing else...  At the same time, she can easily be swayed to vote against her own interests...  I think you give too much credit to average Americans, the fact that what was once considered right wing lunacy is now Tea Party Idealogy is proof in my eyes... 

Terry

Oh, I see. I thought when you said your wife gets worked up over the controversy you meant she was a steady FN watcher/anti-Obama voter (is that UncleEb's wife?). But if she'll vote for him strictly for party loyalty, than I'd say FN isn't very effective. Sure she may get worked up over it, but if she's pulling the lever for D every time anyway, what are they accomplishing (besides causing you/your wife some relatively minor headaches)?

As for average Americans, I've come to the realization that there are a lot of stupid people and they will do what they want and it's not worth my time worrying about their decisions. I've also come to realize it is none of my business to tell people what is in their best interest because every person's situation is different and I could never comprehend the myriad of factors that go into the choices they make. And, with all due respect to twatts, I find it rather arrogant that people so willingly dismiss others' opinions by saying something like "These people are so stupid to believe these things that I deem crazy." This was my whole point in noting the similarities of the competing "news" organizations; everybody is crazy and they tend to align with the crazy people that don't sound so crazy to them. Is that so crazy? So I may not agree or understand how anyone could vote for Rick Santourm, I don't by any means fault them on principle because they would vote for a lunatic. I'll mock them, but I don't fault them for what I perceive to be a misguided belief. As such, I just can't find it in me to assign FN the blame for causing these people to believe what they do. This is likely a product of my faith in free markets, but I think, on the whole, when you get a large enough sample of people they will ultimately get it "right" (whatever that means).

Isn't Fox News the highest rated news channel at this point?

Yes, but that is likely because the FN viewer sees a left-leaning bias in traditional media outlets and as such seeks out "news" that is more in line with their own leanings (i.e., confirmation bias). Also, the opposition outlet always has higher ratings depending on who is in power. MSNBC's ratings were way higher during W (maybe not higher than FN because of the former point, but much higher than they are now).

They may be preaching to the choir and that choir may be solely made up of crazies, but it's a big fucking choir.

 I LOL'd

the other thing is that if you say things loud enough, and often enough, they become true. So if FN says an hours worth for crazy shit, chances are some of it will stick. People will start talking about it, it will be overheard, become a soundbite, and then become true.
ex - Hussein caused 9-11 (most people don't believe it now, but they did when the war started0, death panels

You mean like "If we don't save these banks the entire financial system will collapse!!" :wink:

Also, if you remember, the calls for invading Iraq were been voiced equally as loudly from places like the NYT

Offline DoW

  • In the Band
  • ***
  • Posts: 7821
  • Karma: 931
Re: Fox News: At it again
« Reply #26 on: April 20, 2012, 01:55:59 PM »
how do you define confirmation bias?
because I personally see a lot of left-leaning bias in the traditional media.  however, I find FN just as repulsive.
I really don't need someone on TV or someone to write to confirm I am right about something that really is not about right or wrong.  in most cases, there is not one right or wrong answer (I know not everyone will agree with me on this in here).  look at the healthcare discussion on here.  it is easy to point out the faults on each side of the argument but it is not as easy to point out a solution.

eta:  oh yeah and get back to work so that you can watch the flyers and penguins tonight.
Music is meant to be heard
***Support Bands That Allow Taping/Trading***

http://archive.org/search.php?query=taper%3A%22Brian%20V.%22&sort=-publicdate

Offline runawayjimbo

  • Wrote the Book
  • **
  • Posts: 4710
  • Karma: 186
  • Gender: Male
Re: Fox News: At it again
« Reply #27 on: April 20, 2012, 02:20:44 PM »
how do you define confirmation bias?

Don't ask me, ask Wikipedia: Confirmation bias (also called confirmatory bias, myside bias or verification bias) is a tendency of people to favor information that confirms their beliefs or hypotheses."

because I personally see a lot of left-leaning bias in the traditional media.  however, I find FN just as repulsive.

Seconded

I really don't need someone on TV or someone to write to confirm I am right about something that really is not about right or wrong.  in most cases, there is not one right or wrong answer (I know not everyone will agree with me on this in here).

WHAT'S THAT SUPPOSED TO MEAN?!?! I TOTALLY AGREE WITH YOU, YOU DICK!!

eta:  oh yeah and get back to work so that you can watch the flyers and penguins tonight.

 :hereitisyousentimentalbastard

No shit. Not sure why I'm so distracted today. I think it's because a project that's been literally killing me for the past 6 weeks is wrapping up soon. I haven't had a day off since the weekend before St. Patty's Day. But I'm almost done and then I have an interview for another job on Tuesday. I gotta get the fuck outta here.

Offline VDB

  • In the Band
  • ***
  • Posts: 8066
  • Karma: 279
  • Gender: Male
Re: Fox News: At it again
« Reply #28 on: April 30, 2012, 02:44:46 PM »
Headline and sub-head currently on the front page at FN.com:

Quote
Wind Farms Are Warming The Earth, Research Finds

Researchers discover wind farms heat the ground underneath them at night and may contribute to global warming

Clearly, the message here is "Oh, the delicious irony. Stupid environmentalists!" But it's only ironic if you believe in global warming in the first place -- which I'd wager a certain chunk of the FN audience doesn't, so they don't get to revel in this irony.

Also, the article itself, which was republished from Discovery News, doesn't explicitly say that the researchers claim wind farms can "contribute" to global warming, broadly speaking. This is simply a convenient interpretation by a FN.com editor. The closest the article comes is in saying:

Quote
Dabiri said Zhou's findings may mean taking a second look at the trade-offs with renewable energy.

That's fairly non-committal. And not to mention the other important implication there: trade-off. So let's say wind farms do raise soil surface temperatures (not the same as raising overall atmospheric temperatures) -- the next question to ask is, how does this effect compare against the effects of traditional energy sources like burning coal? If swapping coal out for wind actually heats the earth less, then it does not "contribute" to global warming, it reduces it.
there is no explanation
it's all inside your head


de gustibus non disputandum

Offline VDB

  • In the Band
  • ***
  • Posts: 8066
  • Karma: 279
  • Gender: Male
Re: Fox News: At it again
« Reply #29 on: May 10, 2012, 09:17:25 AM »
Gotta give credit where it's due. FN's Shep Smith is not about to toe the evangelical company line on this one.

Quote
Fox News' Shep Smith seemed to strongly endorse President Obama's newly announced support of same-sex marriage on Wednesday.

Amidst much hype and bated breath, Obama told ABC News' Robin Roberts that he has completed his so-called "evolution" on the issue and now believes that same-sex couples should be allowed to wed.

On his Fox News show, Smith played the tape of Obama speaking, and then said, "the president of the United States, now in the 21st century."

A couple of minutes later, Smith was speaking to his colleague Bret Baier. He asked Baier if the GOP would campaign against same-sex marriage "while sitting very firmly, without much question, on the wrong side of history on it."

Smith closed out the segment by noting that the issue of gay marriage is still up to individual states. He said that Obama's endorsement "makes no legal change for now, which may sound familiar to a couple of generations ago, but that's where we are."
there is no explanation
it's all inside your head


de gustibus non disputandum